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Browsing Tag: enabler

Enabling partner of a narcissistic parent

The enabling mother or father of a narcissistic parent is also personality disordered, and in fact, a secondary abuser, because they keep their child in an absolute torture chamber. The failure of the parent to support the child when in desperate need of release from the narcissistic situation, suggests that the enabling parent’s needs mean more to the parent, than the needs of the child.

The sad reality about enablers’ is that many enabling parents are in actual fact, the kinder parent to the scapegoat child, and to the other children as well. However, the true enabler is a mixed bag; and sometimes this parent can be downright horrible to their children.

How does the scapegoat child feel about the enabling parent?

In adult – hood, the scapegoat child doesn’t know how to feel about the enabling parent. They know that the parent appeared to care for them more-so than the narcissist, and even attempted to protect them from severe abuse at times. However, in the scapegoat child’s eyes the enabler didn’t do enough; and much of the time, gaining support from the enabling parent was like playing a game of lotto. It may happen, or it may not. Support from enabler’s can often depend on their emotions at the time.

For the scapegoat, the scenario goes something like this: the parent may support them today when the narcissist calls them a ‘bitch’ for no reason, or they may not.

The hardest issue for the scapegoated adult – child in this mess fueled by narcissism, is the reality that the enabler also scapegoated their own child at times too, when they decided to side with the narcissist, and to engage in blaming the scapegoat for absolutely everything that was going wrong in the family.

The enabling parent enhances the scapegoat’s fear that they are crazy. Instead of validating the child, and telling them they are not the crazy one, they often unconsciously support the narcissist by defending their sick perception of the scapegoat, which is not real, was never real, and will never be real.

The confusion for the children of the enabler

The adult – children with an enabling parent want to love this parent. After all, they did pay for the private school fees, organise braces, dental appointments and swimming lessons; things that otherwise would most likely not have happened if the child was left in the narcissist’s care without the enabling parent. They want to love this parent that often asked the narcissist to stop calling the child names, hugged and held the child, told them they loved them, and appeared to honestly cherish this child here and there.

However, the emotional conflict the scapegoat child goes through in relation to the enabling parent, is pure mental anguish, because yes, the enabling parent really was the only parent to the child, this is true. However,ultimately they decided not to protect this child when deciding to stay in the situation with the child, instead of leaving the parent with the child.

Where it becomes very complex for children with an enabling parent, is that the enabler is often the kindest parent, the most placid, and the reason why the child wasn’t ultimately destroyed by the narcissist. The enabling parent showed the child some love, which may very well be the reason they came out the other side. However, this parent is also the reason why the child became destroyed in so many other ways, and now struggles terribly in adulthood.

The scapegoat’s overall analysis of the enabler is that they were part of the abuse, and did the wrong thing.

The enabler panders to the narcissist

The enabler panders to the narcissist, tries to keep them happy, and will even become a part of the abuse of the children, if it means the narcissist will get off the enabling parents back. At the end of the day, they are the narcissist’s sidekick, soldier in the narcissist’s army, and thoroughly perpetuate the bullying epidemic even further.

Enabling parents tend to expect support from the children to help to contain the difficult situation, and the narcissist’s rage. They expect the child to make the narcissist happy, to keep them content, and to make sure the narcissist feels admired, special and cared about all the time. In situations such as these, the enabler will perpetuate the abuse by having unusually high standards of the child; and will expect the child to show the narcissist the utmost respect, even when the narcissist is not respecting the child.

The enabling parent will not meet the child on their own emotional level, validate the child, and walk away from the narcissist.

The enabler’s view of the situation

However, the enabler is not going to see it this way. The enabler can be very kind, is terribly loyal to the narcissist, and has an extreme amount of empathy for the damaged person that the narcissist has become. So they dismiss the narcissist’s behaviour, apologise for their abuse, and downplay the abuse for reasons of self-preservation.

The enabler often feels reliant on the narcissist, isolated in their abuse, and as though they are going crazy.

We must not forget that in all of this mess, the enabler has also been incredibly mentally damaged, manipulated, and brainwashed by the narcissist. Sometimes they simply shut down.

The enabler’s favourite phrase: forgive and forget

A lot of enablers’ play down the abuse, tell the children to toughen up, and to forgive the narcissist.

This reality questions the enabler’s ability to access real empathy. Is the enabler truly empathetic at all? After-all, while their child is being denigrated, the enabler watches, says ‘don’t be so sensitive now, forgive and forget,’ and continues on.

To have empathy is to be able to see, and to feel through the eyes, and heart of another.

The enabler is stuck in the vortex with the narcissist and their children. They allow horrific emotional abuse to occur, and become a flying monkey to the narcissist instead of supporting the child. Enablers are renowned for pushing the child to maintain their relationship with the abusive parent later on in life, even after the child realises that they have been the victim of serious mental abuse.

The enabler as the perfect victim for the narcissist

The enabler is the perfect victim for the narcissist. Enabler’s are often quiet, easy to talk to, very placid, and appear to have a lot of empathy. They also lack confidence, second guess themselves, don’t listen to their gut, and don’t believe in themselves.

What keeps the enabler in the home with the narcissist?

Religion:

  • There are a variety of reasons as to why an enabler would want to stay in a life long marriage with an emotionally dangerous person. For some enablers it is religion and fear. They believe that they are not allowed to leave their partner; and once married to a so-called christian narcissist, the enabler, regardless of children or not, must do everything they can to maintain the relationship.

Intergenerational patterns:

The enabler may be acting out on family patterns. They may have had an enabling parent, and a narcissistic parent.

Fear:

The enabler may believe that there is no point in leaving because if they do leave, the narcissist will make their life a living hell. It is very likely the enabler would need to get an AVO out on their narcissist if they left.

Comfort: 

Some enablers’ are not concerned in the slightest about the abuse of the children, and are happy to stay with an abuser for the sake of their comfort pleasures, and the financial growth that has been achieved while with the narcissist.

 

Scapegoated children: Why do they become sitting ducks for abusers?

Scapegoated children of narcissistic parents will often reinvent their own child-hood trauma by choosing severely personality disordered partners with either narcissistic, sociopathic, schizoid, or psychopathic traits. Individuals with severe personality disordered traits will scapegoat anybody with whom they become involved with, because these personality types will not take responsibility for their own behaviour.

The scapegoat only knows one type of relationship, and that is the scapegoat/ narcissistic relationship – which they originally played out with their narcissistic parent. The development of this relationship between the parent and the child became an investment in the narcissist’s eyes. An investment which would deflect from their own shortcomings by blaming someone else.

Why does the scapegoat reinvent their own trauma? 

Lets take a look at the relationship between the narcissistic parent and the scapegoat child to find the answer to this question.

The narcissistic parent ‘murdered,’ and ‘annihilated’ the scapegoat’s soul. It is not unusual for the narcissistic parent to tell neighbours, work colleagues, all of the siblings, the pastor, the pastor’s wife, aunty’s and uncles, and the man down the road, that their child, ‘ the scapegoat,’ is crazy.

Why does the narcissistic parent do this? 

Because the scapegoat had the audacity to correct the narcissist, and to challenge the family system. This isn’t always the reason, and reasons vary. However, this is a common reason why the narcissist will set out to destroy the scapegoat. Any slight, or the smallest of criticisms will send the narcissist into panic mode, through fear of being exposed.

The scapegoat has been trained since birth to believe that every thing negative that goes on inside of the relationships with their family members, is in actual fact, the scapegoat’s fault. If one of the children hits the scapegoat, the scapegoat is at fault. If the scapegoat hits the other child when the child called them a name, than the scapegoat is at fault. If the scapegoat calls the sibling a name, and the sibling hits them, the scapegoat is still at fault.

The scapegoat is shamed daily. Things are said to the scapegoat that will never be said to the other children; and these phrases have the capacity to put the child into a state of inconceivable mental anguish.

The above examples are core reasons as to why the scapegoat reinvents their trauma, and unknowingly gravitates towards people who will scapegoat them.

Example phrases of the types of things that get said to the scapegoat, and about the scapegoat behind the scapegoat’s back:

  • ”You’ll push everybody away when you get older, including your partners.”
  • ”You’re just like my crazy aunty Betty who ruined her children’s lives.”
  • ”You’re just like so and so.” (who has schizophrenia by the way)
  • ”I’m so afraid you are going to end up in prison when you get older.”
  • ”I hope you don’t treat your children like my mother treated me. She was an alcoholic, drank all the money away, and destroyed her children. You should have seen the things she did to us!”
  • ”You’ve never been a happy person.”
  • ”I just don’t understand you.”
  • ” Your aunty cut the family off, and thats what you’ll do too.”

Why does the scapegoat become scapegoated again?

In adulthood the scapegoat goes out into the world and often chooses a partner exhibiting all of the scapegoat’s narcissistic parent’s traits. However, because the scapegoat child hasn’t unpacked the emotional baggage carried from childhood, and sorted each wound out one by one, they won’t be able to recognise potential red flags presented to them. These same red flags presented to them in childhood, were the adult child’s normal.

By the time the scapegoat forms a relationship with a narcissist they no longer believe their own perception of events, and are no longer confident in their assessment of people. The scapegoat’s perceptions of situations have always been invalidated by their narcissistic parent, and family of origin. Whenever they’ve had a problem in this family unit, they have become the problem. So, when problems in their relationships with controlling people begin to occur, the scapegoat blames themselves, and persists in these relationships to no avail.

The scapegoat has been brainwashed by their entire family into believing that they have it all wrong. They have been convinced by the narcissist, their siblings, and the narcissist’s minions, that if they could just change everything about them, then their relationships with the entire family would improve. These beliefs that the scapegoat has about themselves leads them to people please, and to seek approval from dangerous types.

The terribly sad thing is that the scapegoat was right all along, even at the tender age of ten.

In what state does a scapegoat enter a relationship?

The scapegoat doesn’t know what a healthy relationship is like. They have come out the other side of their childhood with poor boundary function, and have come to accept unacceptable behaviour as the norm.

The scapegoat enters their relationships with a huge vulnerability.

The scapegoat:

  • believes that at the core of them is a terribly bad human being
  • Constantly seeks approval, and behaves in a people pleasing fashion
  • has severe rejection issues, and may believe that everybody they form a relationship with will eventually reject them just like their narcissistic parent did
  • carries with them enough shame and self hatred to sink a ship
  • believes that everything they do is wrong, and that they cannot do anything right
  • most likely has ‘complex post traumatic stress disorder’
  • has most likely acted out on the shame and rage projected onto them, which has contributed to more self -shame, and more scapegoating from the family of origin; who now believe that they have the proof that the scapegoat is crazy.

What happens in the scapegoat’s intimate relationships?

The scapegoat often becomes involved with partners whom fail to take responsibility for their own behaviour, blame everybody else, and will always revert the responsibility for the problems within the relationship, back onto the scapegoat – whom often accepts all responsibility, and apologises when they shouldn’t, because of their own detrimental beliefs about self.

The scapegoat continues to try to fix the relationship by trying to fix themselves; all in hope that if they can just fix themselves, the relationship will work. It is not unusual for the scapegoat to go from narcissistic relationship to narcissistic relationship, being scapegoated by people whom have no issue blaming the scapegoat for their own shortcomings.

Some scapegoats will stay in the relationship way past its expiry date, and may even go out with a big bang (due to emotional overload) appearing as the crazy one – again. The scapegoat’s partners will most likely do to the scapegoat exactly what their narcissistic parent did to them – blame shift, and smear the scapegoat’s name with lies, and half truths. However, the perpetrator will never own up to what they did. Instead, they will only share with their minions what the scapegoat’s reaction was to absolute crazy-making, gas-lighting, and goading.

The scapegoat perpetuates their own inner wounds and self-hatred through their continuous liaisons with these kinds of perpetrators.

Why does the scapegoat continue to go from scapegoating relationship to scapegoating relationship?

The scapegoat will often enter a relationship with another personality disordered individual because they are unaware of their own attachment blue – print, which encourages them to gravitate towards narcissists’.

Until they do the recovery programme, and actually sit down with a professional therapist to discuss their relationship patterns, the scapegoat will remain in a fog type state; and will continue to blame themselves for everything that goes wrong in their future relationships.

It usually takes a few failed relationships exhibiting the same pattern before the scapegoat goes in search of answers.

The scapegoat will continue on in this pattern of destructive relationships until they accept that they are not at fault for everything, not responsible for the perpetrator’s behaviour, that they are not bad, and that they have a right to normal, healthy, loving relationships.

Scapegoats walk into relationships with a murdered soul. They often have zero confidence, no self – belief, and are a sitting duck for a crazy maker.

What happens to someone who never learned to trust?

Confuses intensity with intimacy: The scapegoat feels completely unlovable. So when a psychopath, or narcissist comes into the picture and love bombs the scapegoat, they don’t see this as a red flag, because they don’t know whats normal and whats not. Instead they mistake love – bombing as someone finally appreciating them.

Confuses Obsession with care: The scapegoat has been yearning for someone to actually like them, and see some good in them since they were born. When someone cannot get enough of them, they don’t see a problem with this. Its actually quite flattering to a scapegoat. However, a healthy person would run a mile.

Confuses control with intimacy:  Before meeting a partner, a scapegoated individual can feel out of touch with themselves, and as though their life is out of control. Their own parent never took the reigns. To someone whom has never been loved, controlling behaviour can come across to an abuse survivor as love, not control. 

The difference between the scapegoat and healthy people

Healthy people who grew up in families with healthy boundaries know the personality types to stay away from. These people know not to engage a drug addicted person, someone who drinks too much, a person with a history of violence, or a person who refuses to take responsibility for their behaviour. They know what they want in life, and they won’t settle for less.

Healthy people are confident, and they have self-love. If they notice a huge character floor, they are self – assured enough to know that the person the character floor belongs to has a screw loose – not them. The healthy person listens to their intuition, whereas the scapegoat tells their intuition to go away, and convinces themselves that they are the one with the problem, not the perpetrator.

Healthy people also know their limits. They know that someone who loves them would not deliberately go out of their way to push others to emotional extremes; whereas the scapegoat has only ever had close relationships with people who push the scapegoat to emotional extremes. A healthy person can pick a crazy maker from a mile away.

Scapegoated children are trained to accept that their perception of the narcissist is wrong, that their intuition is incorrect, and that the narcissist’s treatment of them is acceptable. Unfortunately, the scapegoat may re-enact their abuse by choosing a partner very similar to their parent.